2014-11-26 Birds, Carnivores, and All Sorts of Things

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Plenty of basil, still growing wherever it wants.
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Pie and Saucy have a pair of new youngsters: Hungry B Bird and Euphemia Morsel. The recent heatwave prompted me to get out a pool for the dog. Hungry took advantage.

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“Hey, while you’re looking for a bit of mince, I’ll just see if there’s anything up here worth eating…”

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Brave enjoys the benefits of his successful grant application.

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This guy ate most of my little cayenne plants. Does he have a serious hankering to become hasenpfeffer?

IMG_7737Flying ant, courtesy of my camera’s macro setting. It beats squinting or looking for the Fresnel lens.

IMG_7739Brave, father of Pip.

IMG_7740Pip, who is now being given the bum’s rush by his parents. I don’t know if he’ll keep turning up for much longer.

IMG_7741One of the tiny Sarracenias (species unknown) from the seed tray which was washed out in a thunderstorm.

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IMG_7743Another tiny Sarracenia from the same tray.

IMG_7744The third specimen.

IMG_7748The Zimbabwean Birdseye pepper has begun fruiting.

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IMG_7750Lost the tag: I think this is a Habanero.

IMG_7751Trinidad Scorpion “Butch T” pepper. This was the record hottest variety until recently. (I’m growing seeds of the Carolina Reaper, the new record-holder.)

IMG_7752One of the cayennes that Bastard Hare didn’t get.

IMG_7753A Jalapeno plant. This one’s already spent two years in a hanging basket, before transplantation to the bed. It’s fruiting nicely.

IMG_7754A younger Jalapeno, from a different supplier.

IMG_7755Two Ancho chillies. The light green plants are Canna (native arrowroot).

IMG_7756My own accidental hybrid, the Red Ribbed Rocket, has established itself in the middle of a grevillea bush in the front garden, and done very nicely there. This will be its third year, which is pretty good in a climate where most chillies are annuals due to frost.

IMG_7757Red Ribbed Rockets are about 7/10 for heat, equivalent to a Cayenne. They’re reasonably resistant to dry weather, and prolific fruiters.

IMG_7758aWe’ve got a few varieties of Gazanias.

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IMG_7769LEGO Pig Cosplayer Guy is acting as size-reference. This is one of the three tiny Sarracenias in the storm-damaged tray.

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IMG_7772Number Two…

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IMG_7775And the third one.

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IMG_7777One of the more advanced seedlings: a Sarracenia purpurea, in its second year.

IMG_7779Sarracenia purpurea, second-year seedling. The following shots are all the same species and age, with one exception.

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IMG_7781This one’s the exception. It may be a purpurea, and seems to have sprouted very recently. Perhaps it’s lain dormant for a couple of years.

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IMG_7785The little surprise pitcher is in the foreground. One of the smaller 2nd-year purpureas is at Cosplay Pig Guy’s feet.

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IMG_7793Drosera spatulata growing in the same tub as one of the large S. purpurea plants.

IMG_7794One of the flytraps, and a few Drosera capensis.

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Some more second-year purpureas.

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IMG_7805A second-year purpurea. It’s had a hard life.

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IMG_7808Baby D. spatulata

IMG_7810Mature D. spatulata – the blackened edge on the leaf of plant in right foreground is frost damage from last winter.

IMG_7813This D. capensis has just been transplanted. After a few days’ acclimatisation, it’s off to a sunny window-sill in a friend’s office.

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IMG_7824Some shots from the bathtub swamp garden.

IMG_7825The one Nepenthes I didn’t kill,  slowly making a comeback.

IMG_7827Broome chilli seedlings.

IMG_7828My largest S. leucophylla.

2014-10-30 Very Small Sarracenias

I previously wrote about the one specimen which had survived massive flooding of my seedling tray, last Summer.

Closer examination reveals there are three baby Sarracenia (either S. flava or S. leucophylla: I can’t be sure) in the one tray of three to show any signs of life.

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The poor wee things were so small, I didn’t notice two of them until I cleared away the bladderwort stems.

Again, my thanks to Fishie for the seeds.

2014-10-23 Groundcover and Chillies

IMG_7523Euphorbia, Pigface, Gazania and a few succulent cuttings. This is experimental, and the goal is to see which plants spread, and which help hold the embankment together.IMG_7524Liriope and Seaside Daisy.IMG_7525 IMG_7526 IMG_7527 IMG_7530The bank, from below.IMG_7531 IMG_7532After mulching.

IMG_7533This line is mostly chillies. IMG_7534 IMG_7535The long-lived Cambuci chilli bush, which has survived frost, flood and drought. IMG_7537Gazania cuttings, intended for the embankment.

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A few exotic chillies in the incubator, germinating.

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An attempt to recreate the incubator’s conditions, on the cheap.